I’m peaking in my career

  
Supposedly, I’m peaking. And this isn’t about egg yolk and marenge pie. I’m 43 years old, have been in medical practice for fourteen years, and am looking at a canyon in 360-degrees from where I stand. That’s what the data says. I wonder if I am going to do the electric slide or how I’ll boogie through the next years of medical practice. I try to think, “This is the best moment of my life, right now,” any time self stigma and fear of mortality creeps in. (That’s not saying, “This is as good as it’s going to get!” Ha!) I want to cherish the gift of practicing medicine, for however long I am blessed with it. 

It’s a popular discussion amongst my colleagues these days, about how long a physician should practice. There’s a newer’ish respected program called, PACE, that evaluates physician competency to practice as they get old.  This is a huge shift in the culture of medicine. It’s meant to respectfully assist rather than discriminate with ageism. I try to imagine what it might feel like if I were approached and asked to take the test. 

So what does a psychiatrist rocking her best jeans have to show for herself anyway, you may ask. Well, (tapping the mike), “I’d like to first say thank you to my sponsors….” Wink.  I mean my patients! Thank you. 

…Hey! This peak is crowded! Give me some room!

Ahem. But at my “peak,” at the best of my career, I thought it would be fun to play around with, “Why?” What’s in my doctor’s bag that is so special?

  • Ask, “Why do you want to be alive?”
  • Start all work-ups with a medical work-up. 
  • Give full informed consent with the 5-Treatment Paradigms of Psychiatry
  1. chemical (medication), 
  2. psychotherapy, 
  3. hospitalization (inpatient and outpatient), 
  4. alternatives (such as acupuncture, massage, sleep hygiene, lifestyle change, etc.), 
  5. stimulation therapies (such as ECT or TMS).  There’s nothing else (that I know of 🙂 ) that anyone is going to offer you in psychiatry, no matter who’s clinic you go to. 
    • Push to full treatment response. 
    • Work toward quality of life, not cure, not perfect.  Ask again, “What makes like worth living for?” Design treatment toward those goals. 
    • Routinely and deliberately consider the flow of patient’s treatment agendas with physician treatment agendas. 
    • Mood journal. Nobody believes they were “that bad” after they feel better. Everyone wants to stop treatment when they feel better. (This is why there are so many repeat pregnancies, for example!). We all need our own voice (mood journal) to look back on and speak the truth. 
    • Fight for oxygen. If your patient has sleep apnea, don’t stop working toward treatment compliance. There are no medications that can take the place or make up for oxygen to the brain. 
    • Community. More community. 
    • The third eye – a therapist. None of us can be a mirror into ourselves. We all need someone outside of the “triangle” to speak.

    I’ll be thinking of more as I try to go to sleep tonight, but it’s bed time. I’m off! Sleep hygiene! Arg!

    Self-care Tip: Evaluate your position in your lifeline, and treasure where and who you are with deliberation. Keep on!

    Questions: Where are you in your lifeline? Are you struggling with ageism? What gives you value? Please speak! I, and the rest of us, really need your voice.